New Speed Memory World Records by Ramón Campayo

New speed memory world records by Ramón Campayo at the Torneo Internacional de Memoria Rápida:

  • 1 second decimal digits: 20
  • 1 second binary digits: 48
  • 4 second binary digits: 96

Incredible…

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8 comments

  • How is this possible if Campayo doesn’t have eidetic memory? And why doesn’t he compete in the standard memory competitions? I picked up his book earlier this year and read through parts of it. But when his descriptions of his major system were not consistent, and I assumed the translation was bad, and I gave up on it. The part on speed-reading was interesting but I am always skeptical of these claims.

  • I downloaded their software and tried it. When memorizing the numbers, I believe they are spaced apart according to whatever system you use. So if your system chunks numbers in threes, you could space it like this:

    020 614 092 322 856 123 567

    If you can convert them to images quickly, it should be possible to memorize a lot. If binary numbers are chunked in 10s, that is only 4.8 images. It sounds extremely difficult to do in one second, but not impossible.

    I have a theory about phonetic systems which I’ll save for another blog post, but basically, it’s very easy to memorize familiar words. A person can memorize this 34 character sequence in less than a second:

    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

    With a strict phonetic system that is made up of artificial one-syllable words, reading a line of numbers should be similar to reading a line of words in English. The sequence of digits, “020 614 092 322 856 123 567,” then becomes 7 one-syllable words — or seven bits of information that can be memorized without even having to place them in loci. You could repeat them a few times to put them in long-term memory, just like a phone number.

    This is how my system is supposed to work, but it isn’t finished yet, so it’s just theoretical at the moment…

  • Always interesting to read of Ramon.

    I tried his software, too. His record for 4 s decimals seems to be 29,5.

    30 is definitely possible. My best after a few tries was 26, I think.

    We had some great fun at http://www.memocamp.de. There you can try 50 digits and 100 digits speed runs.

    At the moment, the records are 7.77s for 50 and 25.19 s for 100. While the 7.77 s is a very good time, the 25.19 s should be quite easily improvable to under 20 s. Alas, 50 is more fun, because you don’t need to invest that many locations.

    Bye

    Simon

  • Do you place the the images in locations in the fast events, like 4 second numbers? I’m curious whether it can be done without locations…

  • damn thats fast how can i achieve that?

  • That is so fast. How could one person do that. I have read a lot of Mr. Lorayne books about memory but I can’t find this speed to memorize. Please advice. i want to get invoilved in this memory competition.

    Solomon

  • There is some information in the wiki:
    https://blog.artofmemory.com/wiki/Special:AllPages

    and a forum where you can ask questions:
    https://blog.artofmemory.com/x/

    More people will read your questions there… 🙂

  • Where do you live Solomon ?

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