Stream Capture: Taking Control of Thought Triggers with Visualization Techniques

My post yesterday was about how I think about mnemonic images. The purpose of that post was to lead into this one which goes more into my thoughts on using mnemonic visualization techniques to modify thought habits.

I previously wrote about my technique on how I change a number’s image and the psychological effect of memory techniques, and how I assign temporary names to unknown objects and ideas in order to remember them. This post expands on that idea with illustrations. Read more

Thought “Triggers”, “Streams”, and “Deltas”

As I mentioned in another post, when I don’t know the name for something, I make up a temporary name for it. Language makes ideas easier to remember and manipulate.

The purpose of this post is just to share how I visualize the process of creating mnemonic images.

I’m sure all of these concepts have real names, so If someone has a background in psychology and knows a better way to describe these ideas, please post a comment. Read more

The Psychological Effect of Memory Techniques

I’ve wondered if there is potential with these memory techniques to change ways of thinking. Last winter, I noticed that I constantly had a certain negative thought out of habit. I made a conscious effort to modify the image to change its meaning to something ridiculous every time the thought appeared. The technique gradually worked to get rid of that negative thought. (Something like this technique I’ve been using to modify images.) Read more

Should Mnemonic Images Be Pleasant?

As I try to hardwire associations between images and numbers in my brain, I’m finding that I like to see certain numbers.

When I first took up memory techniques, I noticed that if my images were pleasing, I tended to be more intrigued by them. If the images weren’t interesting, I didn’t like to see them. I try to avoid inherently unpleasant images in my system, though the images can be doing unpleasant things when placed in memory journeys. Read more

More Images from Verdi

I wasn’t feeling good yesterday, so I spent part of the day watching YouTube videos.  I ended up collecting some more images from Verdi.

Jon Vickers as Otello fits #175 which was previously “telephone” (now #802). Otello’s hair, bulky clothes, and dramatic staggering are distinctive.  Cornell MacNeil as Iago will be #337.  The buttons on his costume are memorable, as well as his goatee and villainous gesturing.
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